5 amazing things our body does during pregnancy

Sometimes it feels like trust in birth is at an all time low here in the UK. Every week there seems to be a news item that gives parents to be new guidance, and none of it is good. There might be an article covering research that shows that labour should be induced at 39 weeks or another TV report that tells us that staffing levels are at an all time low.

The overall message for a nervous mum to be? You should be worried about what you’re about to experience. You’ll need all the help you can get.

This makes me so sad. Honestly it does. It’s like setting ourselves up for a massive fall. If you start your birth from a place of fear, that can only get worse as labour progresses. And why start there? What purpose does fear serve? For any of us?

So instead, to balance this less productive mindset, let’s consider 5 amazing facts about our wonderful bodies that show just how incredible they really are.

1. Super woman levels of oestrogen

A pregnant woman makes more oestrogen during her pregnancy than she does in the rest of her life. Oestrogen is the growth hormone. During the first trimester it helps grow the placenta, improves the transfer of nutrients through the umbilical cord and fuels the very rapid development of the tiny foetus. Later in pregnancy, you’ll see it’s wonderful effect in your strong nails, glowing skin and lush hair. It literally makes everything renew and flourish.

2. If you have a girl, you’re carrying two generations

You may not have thought of this incredible fact before. Are you over thirty? Perhaps you might have heard the slightly depressing fact that women are born with only a certain number of eggs then. You have all you will ever have when you’re born. Flip this around though, as I do now, and consider instead that if you have a little girl, you have also just been responsible for growing your grandchildren. Of course, she will have to decide to have them, but they are there all the same! Tiny eggs in her tiny ovaries, waiting to grow and ripen.

3. Your brain becomes more like a mother’s

As any mother can attest, your brain really does rearrange itself to adapt to its new role. Somehow, from somewhere, you find some superpowers which give you the ability to remember all the doctors appointments, pack baby bags each day and still manage to eat/wash/talk to non parents. The other incredible thing? Your brain prunes away the clutter it doesn’t need to allow you to become more empathetic, a change which will never reverse. Baby brain doesn’t sound so bad after all.

4. Your baby will let you know when it’s ready to meet you

As babies are growing in the womb, their lungs are full of amniotic fluid and they breathe through the placenta and umbilical cord. As they have this support system in place, they can prioritise developing all the other bits of their body before they need to be able to breathe air by themselves. Around about 32 weeks, as their lungs are completing their growth, they begin produce a chemical called a surfactant – essentially what we all have in our lungs that stops them collapsing as we breathe. Scientists found out that this surfactant chemical is what provides the signal to the mother that the baby is ready. When it accumulates to a high enough volume, it acts as a signal that labour can start, usually from 36 weeks onwards.

5. Boys and girls receive different compositions of breast milk

True fact! Milk for girls is higher volume with more glucose and calcium. Milk for boys is lower in volume with more fat and protein. Researchers also think that hormone levels differ too which would make a lot of sense. Right from the beginning boys receive more cortisol and growth hormone, fuelling their larger physical frames.

And finally: Dads’ hormones change too

Just before a new baby arrives Dad’s testosterone levels drop and prolactin (a natural bonding hormone as well as the one that produces milk) is increased. One theory is that it prevents men looking for a new partner and instead prompts them to look after their current one and new family – plus cope better with the potential short term lack of sex… not bad hey?

Looking at this list, I find it really hard to believe that anyone could think that nature doesn’t have our back and that our bodies haven’t been designed to be anything other than amazing. Of course, it’s brilliant that we can access full medical care when we need it but, women, we can really afford to be proud ourselves too.

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This post was written for and first appeared on The Natural Parent Magazine.